W5

After capturing one million viewers last week with its most-watched episode in three years, W5 returns with its annual in-depth investigation of the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) this Saturday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Mobile.

W5 presents all-new cases that reveal shocking tax horror stories faced by hard-working, ordinary Canadians when they come up against the taxman.

Then, Seamus O’Regan returns to Newfoundland with a story about one woman’s efforts to revitalize her homeland of Fogo Island, the struggling fishing community that is positioning itself as an international destination for the arts.

W5 also airs Sundays on CP24 at 1 p.m. ET, and at 7 p.m. ET on CTV Two, and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings).

Last week, W5’s powerful documentary “Murder For Love”, featuring exclusive access to the story of Kim Walker, who was convicted for killing his daughter’s boyfriend, delivered one million viewers Saturday at 7 p.m. on CTV against a high-profile edition of HOCKEY NIGHT IN CANADA. It was the most-watched W5 episode in three years.

This week, “Unfair Advantage” investigates tax cases from coast-to-coast and finds Canadians who have had their financial well-being shattered at the hand of callous and secretive CRA employees. The third in an annual series of in-depth W5 investigations into the out-of-control taxman, “Unfair Advantage” continues to chase startling stories of insensitivity and unaccountability revealed in W5 episodes in 2010 (“A Taxing Problem”) and 2011 (“The Audit”).

W5 looks into inequitable treatment for Newfoundland cod fishermen. After a government bailout, the CRA demanded the fishermen treat the money as capital gains and took back tens of thousands of dollars in tax payments. What the taxman didn’t reveal was that it issued refunds to more than one hundred fishermen in 2004 – leaving hundreds more out of pocket and still fighting to get back their money. Newfoundlander and fisherman’s wife Elizabeth Harvey took up the cause of the fishermen who didn’t receive equal treatment, and shares the David and Goliath tale of her 12-year quest for answers and justice from the powerful CRA.

In W5’s second story, reporter Seamus O’Regan takes viewers to Fogo Island. O’Regan shares the story of Zita Cobb, who returns to her native home with a plan to revitalize the struggling out-port community as an international destination for the arts. Cobb, the daughter of illiterate parents who grew up with no running water or electricity, went on to study business at University of Ottawa, later becoming a very successful multi-millionaire. Along with her brother Tony, Cobb co-founded the Shorefast Foundation, a charity that she has staked with more than $30 million of her own money– jumpstarting a cultural renaissance on the island. In classic “build it and they will come” fashion, the tourists are starting to pour in to see what the New York Times called last year “one of the world’s 41 must-see places”.

With an ongoing commitment to covering tough, relevant stories with fair and responsible reporting, W5 is in its 46th season of investigative journalism. Hosted by Lloyd Robertson, the award-winning series is the most-watched documentary program in Canada. Anton Koschany is Executive Producer of W5. Brett Mitchell is Senior Producer. Wendy Freeman is President of CTV News.

On Saturday, Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Mobile, W5 Host and Chief Correspondent Lloyd Robertson takes viewers to Saskatchewan for the powerful documentary “Murder For Love”, featuring exclusive access to the story of Kim Walker, who was convicted for killing his daughter’s boyfriend.

W5 also airs Sundays on CP24 at 1 p.m. ET, and at 7 p.m. ET on CTV Two, and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings).

In June 2011, Walker was found guilty of manslaughter for the shooting death of James Hayward in Yorkton, SK. Walker’s daughter, Jadah, was 16-years-old at the time and had moved in with her 24-year-old boyfriend – whom the RCMP had identified as a major drug dealer in the Prairie city.

“We follow many threads in this story,” said Robertson. “From Walker’s trial that ends, in the first case, with a murder conviction, and on appeal is reduced to manslaughter, to the actions of the police and why they didn’t move on Hayward earlier. And we hear from the victim‘s brother Dan, who tells us about the deep sense of loss felt by his own family as he chillingly reveals his feeling that Kim Walker got away with murder.”

W5 delivers riveting interviews with Walker, Walker’s wife Liz, RCMP Corporal Catherine Shepherd, Hayward’s brother Dan, daughter Jadah, and also Jadah’s best friend at the time, Jessica Andrew. As Robertson recaps the events of the last nine years with the people directly involved, Walker’s family retells the painful details of how Jadah had become addicted to hard drugs and moved in with the biggest drug dealer in town, and how her parents had done all they could, including having her confined to the local mental health unit.

In addition to recounting the tragic story with the Walkers, the documentary lets viewers hear, for the first time, the chilling 9-1-1 call made by Jadah Walker right after the murder. Evidence, photos, and police videotape catalogue the horrific crime scene.

“Murder For Love” was produced and directed by Larry Day and Pyramid Productions, in association with CTV. With an ongoing commitment to covering tough, relevant stories with fair and responsible reporting, W5 is in its 46th season of investigative journalism. Hosted by Lloyd Robertson, the award-winning series is the most-watched current affairs program in Canada. Anton Koschany is Executive Producer of W5. Brett Mitchell is Senior Producer. Wendy Freeman is President of CTV News.

W5

7:00pm – Saturday, February 4 on CTV

In the first story, “Pull the Plug,” W5 asks “who decides when you die?” with a look at two cases at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital where the families and doctors have different opinions on how much should be done to prolong a patient’s life. In the second story, “Watson’s War,” W5 reports on eco-activism’s “enfant terrible,” Paul Watson.

This week on W5, Victor Malarek takes viewers inside an emotional issue, looking at two ongoing battles between families and doctors over “do not resuscitate” orders.

On Saturday, Feb. 4 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Mobile, W5, Canada’s #1 documentary series, asks “who decides when you die?”

W5 looks at two cases at Toronto’s Sunnybrook Hospital where the families and doctors have different opinions on how much should be done to prolong a patient’s life.

Then, in a second story, Malarek takes viewers inside the world of environmental activist Captain Paul Watson, whose extreme and risky interventions aim to put a stop to the ongoing slaughter of whales and seals. 

W5, also airs Sundays at 1 p.m. ET on CP24 and at 7 p.m. ET on CTV Two, and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings). 

In “Pull the Plug,” W5 looks at the case of Douglas DeGuerre, a man who died at Sunnybrook when doctors refused to intervene as he went into respiratory arrest. His daughter, Joy Wawryniak, had power of attorney, and wanted everything possible done to keep him alive. Despite Wawryniak’s pleas, doctors wrote DNR on his chart and refused to provide further care. In a second case, Hassan Rasouli is currently on life support despite the doctors’ medical opinion that he is in a vegetative state with no chance of recovery. Rasouli’s family believes he will recover and have refused to let doctors remove him from a ventilator. Emotionally overwhelming for families, the decision to end a patient’s life raises a host of complicated legal issues: the Rasouli case is headed to the Supreme Court of Canada after lower court decisions ruled doctors do not have a unilateral right to withdraw treatment from a patient and a specialized board should determine any disputes.

Malarek’s second story, “Watson’s War,” focuses on ecological activism and its leading champion, Captain Paul Watson, star of Animal Planet’s hit series WHALE WARS. While environmental issues motivate many to support campaigns to save the planet and its creatures, usually with financial donations and occasionally by speaking out, Captain Watson believes in an in-your-face approach. He has rammed driftnet fishing boats, scuttled whaling ships and has stood between seal hunters and their prey. Captain Watson has been fined and assaulted, but refuses to give up. Founder of The Sea Shepherd Conservation Society, Watson is a Canadian, who has been a high-seas activist for 40 years. He was one of the founding members of Greenpeace but left the organization over a disagreement over tactics.

W5’s report about Watson provides an intimate look at the environmental warrior – at his home in the San Juan Islands, between Victoria and Washington State, and through dramatic footage of his encounters with whalers, sealers, even warships. Through it all Watson is unrepentant, telling Malarek: “All I’m interested in is defending my clients – whales, dolphins, sharks or fish, not people.”

With an ongoing commitment to covering tough, relevant stories with fair and responsible reporting, W5 is in its 46th season of investigative journalism. Hosted by Lloyd Robertson, the award-winning series is the most-watched current affairs program in Canada. Anton Koschany is Executive Producer of W5. Brett Mitchell is Senior Producer. Wendy Freeman is President of CTV News.

On Saturday, Jan. 28 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Mobile, CTV’s Beverly Thomson, on special assignment to W5, reveals the potential dangers of cosmetic laser treatment.

Promising smooth, hairless, flawless skin the treatments were once limited to dermatologists’ offices. Now laser treatment is the fastest-growing cosmetic procedure and is widely available in salons and through daily online deals.

W5 discovers that such laser treatments are completely unregulated, and in the wrong hands, horrific injuries can result, including severe burns and permanent scarring.

In the second report W5’s Victor Malarek looks at the use of chimpanzees in medical research. Outside Montreal he finds a chimpanzee sanctuary, where chimps that have “retired” from research laboratories spend their waning years. In Louisiana, W5 gets a rare and exclusive look inside the New Iberia Research Centre, a facility still using chimpanzees for research, and investigates the methods used to conduct research on chimps.

W5, Canada’s #1 documentary series, also airs Sundays at 1 p.m. ET on CP24 and at 7 p.m. ET on CTV Two, and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings).

In “Don’t Get Burned”, W5 dispatches two female mystery shoppers, equipped with hidden cameras, to visit a random sampling of beauty salons offering laser treatments in an effort to see first-hand the often dubious claims made by some aestheticians. In a prior consultation with a dermatologist, W5’s mystery shoppers are warned that skin type and colour should determine the type of treatment received. But at most salons, the women are told one laser can do it all, with no risk of side effects.

W5 speaks with victims of laser treatments gone horribly wrong.  No one is keeping track of how many Canadians are injured by these unregulated treatments, but in a survey prepared for W5 by the Canadian Dermatology Association, doctors reveal the astounding numbers of injuries they have seen as a result of treatments, including scarring, infection, pigment change and severe burns.   

W5 also reveals how easy it is for anyone to become certified to use these high risk medical devices. W5’s producer was trained in less than one hour, certified to begin offering laser treatments, and then able to rent one of the powerful machines to set up her own laser spa.

In “Monkey Business,” Victor Malarek examines the use of chimpanzees in laboratory research. W5 visits The Fauna Foundation, a sanctuary south of Montreal that houses chimps once used in research, and The New Iberia Research Center in Louisiana, the largest primate research facility in the world, to take a closer look at the issues, costs, benefits, and drawbacks of using chimps for medical vaccine research. The New Iberia Center was criticized in 2008 when the American Humane Society released shocking hidden camera video depicting alleged cruelty against the chimps. Public opinion on this topic varies widely and there is currently a bill before Congress in the United States to ban the use of chimps in medical protocols altogether.

With an ongoing commitment to covering tough, relevant stories with fair and responsible reporting, W5 is in its 46th season of investigative journalism. Hosted by Lloyd Robertson, the award-winning series is the most-watched current affairs program in Canada. Anton Koschany is Executive Producer of W5. Brett Mitchell is Senior Producer. Wendy Freeman is President of CTV News.

W5

7:00pm – Saturday, November 19 on CTV

W5 looks at the mysterious disappearance of Mariam Makhniashvili, a bizarre case that has stumped police for more than 2 years.

This week, W5, Canada’s #1 documentary program, takes viewers inside the case of Mariam Makhniashvili, the 17-year-old Toronto teen who disappeared without a trace on Sept. 14, 2009, while on her way to school. “Into Thin Air” airs Saturday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Mobile.

Reported by CP24’s Sue Sgambati, on special assignment to W5, the special one-hour episode of W5 takes viewers inside the investigation into the mysterious and troubling disappearance of the teen who had recently arrived from the Republic of Georgia. The documentary also examines the back story of the Makhniashvili family and the complex web of confusion and controversy that has surrounded them even as they have struggled to find their missing daughter.

W5 repeats Sundays at 1 p.m. ET on CP24, and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings).

“This is a really strange story and it’s very complicated,” said Sgambati. “Canadians have been really interested in this case and we’ve pulled together all the elements into a full-edition of W5, so that we can present the biggest picture possible both to try to comprehend what happened and perhaps jog someone’s memory to provide a clue that might bring Miriam home.”

In an in-depth interview, Mariam’s mother, Lela Tabidze, speaks to W5, giving viewers insight into the case and the family’s history. From the family’s native Republic of Georgia, where Mariam was born amid the country’s civil war, to her eventual emigration to Toronto, where Mariam and her brother were reunited with their parents after a five-year separation, W5 searches for the missing clues in this daunting case. W5 also retraces the surprising crimes committed by Vakhtang Makhniashvili, including an exclusive interview with Sean Ure, the neighbour who was stabbed in an unprovoked attack by Mariam’s father.

Mariam’s disappearance launched what is believed to be the largest missing-person search in Toronto’s history. In addition to a full-out air, land and water search of the neighbourhood where Mariam was last seen, investigators canvassed the entire area, knocking on more than 6,000 doors. Mariam’s distraught parents have made anguished appeals for help to find their daughter – a story that has attracted attention around the world.

This week, Canada’s #1 documentary series heads to Victoria, B.C., where the police force has been defending itself over accusations of using excessive force and violent behaviour.

On Saturday, Nov. 12 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Mobile, CTV’s Tom Walters, on special assignment to W5, is armed with troubling video evidence, and asks if the police in the city of Victoria are being held to a different standard than ordinary citizens.

Then, Lloyd Robertson heads to Ottawa for a story about the country’s costly, but chronically broken-down submarines. 

W5 repeats Sundays at 1 p.m. ET on CP24, at 7 p.m. ET on CTV Two and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings).

In the first part of this week’s episode, “Cop-Out”, W5 visits the picturesque city of Victoria, B.C., a city known for its stunning natural beauty and its startling police scandals. With uncomfortable regularity, the Victoria police have been accused of using excessive force. In some cases, including ones with video evidence, the police investigations into the accusations have determined that there were no problems. Critics suggest that British Columbia’s system of policing its police isn’t working. It has become such a problem that the B.C. Civil Liberties Association now advises its clients not to use the Police Complaints Commission. Walters tracks down the victims, the Victoria Police Chief, and the B.C. Attorney General, Shirley Bond, to get to the bottom of the story.

W5: Gloria

7:00pm – Saturday, October 22 on CTV

In “Gloria”, W5 interviews legendary feminist, author and activist, Gloria Steinem.

This Saturday, Canada’s most-watched documentary series, W5, journeys to the top of the world following Canadian researchers on a quest to be the first to visit a legendary shipwreck.

On special assignment for W5, CTV’s Sandie Rinaldo gets to the bottom of the fascinating story of the doomed British ship, HMS Investigator, which became stuck in the arctic ice nearly 160 years ago, eventually sunk, and since has been FROZEN IN TIME. The all-new episode premieres Saturday, Oct. 22 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV. 

The episode also airs Sunday, Oct. 23 at 1 p.m. ET on CP24 and at 7 p.m. ET on CTV Two, and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings).

In 1850, HMS Investigator was deployed by the British Navy to search for the lost Franklin Expedition, which was exploring the Northwest Passage. Instead of finding the lost ships, HMS Investigator was stuck in the ice in Mercy Bay for two harrowing years. Not all of the crew members survived the ordeal.

In a special one-hour episode, W5 delivers a stunning showcase of exclusive underwater footage of this majestic ship, as the Parks Canada team of underwater archaeologists dive the site for the first time. Also, W5 follows the terrestrial archaeology team across the tundra in Aulavik National Park, as they discover previously unseen artefacts from the Investigator’s stay in Mercy Bay and reveal the unmarked graves of some of the crew members who died there. Moreover, the documentary showcases breathtaking arctic vistas and aerial panoramas during this extraordinary adventure. Rinaldo captures the incredible story through interviews with the research team, as they share their experience.