March 2012

Wednesday, February 29 at 8:30pm ET/PT (7:30CT, 9:30MT) on Citytv

“Poetic Injustice”

When Fred Shay (Chris Parnell) and Sheila (Ana Gasteyer) initiate a croquet match with Dallas (Cheryl Hines) and George (Jeremy Sisto), Fred misreads Sheila’s interest in George. Later, Fred tells George that Sheila is fantasizing about him and asks him to seduce her. Meanwhile, Tessa (Jane Levy) desperately wants to impress the new poetry teacher, Ms. Evans (guest star Jackie Geary, Rizzoli & Isles) but she seems to prefer Dalia’s (Carly Chaikin) prose.

Wednesday February 29 – 8pm ET/PT on Global

And remember, the enhanced Global Video App expands the Survivor viewing experience with trivia questions, polls, photo challenges and more. Weathering the harsh elements sparks new battles between the tribes and poor communication leaves castaways scrambling at a frustrating Immunity Challenge.

Wednesday, February 29 at 8pm ET/PT (7CT, 9MT) on Citytv

“The Leap Year”

Sue’s (Eden Sher) birthday falls on a leap year causing her to be overly excited about celebrating her big day in a big way. But, given her parents’ track record with celebrations, she may need to lower her expectations. Meanwhile, Frankie (Patricia Heaton) discovers that Mike (Neil Flynn) has been taking care of a stray cat at work for years; Brick (Atticus Shaffer) falls for a pretty girl in his social skills class; and Axl (Charlie McDermott) becomes enthralled with vacuuming the house.

Everyone knows about the Pirates of the Caribbean. Johnny Depp’s portrayal of pirate Jack Sparrow is already the stuff of movie legend.

But what about the pirates of Atlantic Canada? Pirates and Privateers is a half hour documentary that explores the rough-and-tumble history of marine piracy in the Maritimes.

Hundreds of years ago, the secluded coves and inlets of the Maritimes were perfect hiding places for pirates avoiding detection by the King’s navy. And with the huge fishing industry, the Maritimes were a perfect hunting ground for supplies, ships and new recruits.

Pirates and Privateers introduces the viewer to several notorious pirates who plundered Atlantic Canada, and tells a story that recalls the blunderbuss, the cutlass, evil deeds, and supposed buried treasure.

Not many Canadians know what is meant by the word “privateer”, even though privateering was a significant social and financial force in times of war, whether against the Spanish, the French, or the Americans during the War of 1812. Pirates and Privateers explains how the business of privateering worked, as practiced in one of Canada’s most successful privateering centres: Liverpool Nova Scotia.

Pirates and Privateers was written and directed by award-winning Halifax documentary-maker Geoff D’Eon, best known for his work on This Hour Has 22 Minutes and CBC Television’s Doc Zone. The documentary was produced by Edward Peill from Halifax-based Tell Tale Productions Inc.

“There are so many rich pirate stories in Atlantic Canada, it was hard to know which ones to pick. And how many times have we all heard that Stan Roger’s song Barrett’s Privateers,” says D’Eon. “It brings the house down every time, but it’s amazing how few people actually know what a privateer was.  Hopefully, this documentary will clear up the confusion.”

Pirates and Privateers will have its world broadcast premiere on CBC Television’s Land & Sea on Sunday, March 4, 2012 at 12 Noon. Following the broadcast, the documentary can be watched on the CBC TV website at:  www.cbc.ca/landandsea. Land & Sea is one of CBC’s longest running TV series and can be followed on Twitter: @cbclandandsea

This week, youth hockey players from the Calgary area kicked off the second annual Breakfast Television Outdoor Classic, an exciting competition that will culminate with a final showdown at the Scotiabank Saddledome on Friday, March 2, beginning at 6:15am on Citytv.

“Last year’s inaugural BT Outdoor Classic tournament surpassed our expectations, and we were blown away with the passion, dedication and tremendous commitment from the players,” said Paul Schmidt, Manager, Local Content, Citytv Calgary. “There’s nothing more heartwarming than seeing the absolute joy of these young athletes playing purely for the love of the game, and the thrill of sharing the same ice as their hockey heroes,” said Schmidt. 

On Friday, March 2 from 5:30am to 9am, Breakfast Television’s Ted Henley, Tara Slone, Jill Belland and Andrew Schultz will be live on-location from the Scotiabank Saddledome to cover all the action and cheer on the next generation of hockey stars.

Breakfast Television has been live on-location all week at different outdoor rinks to cover the tournament, where the games will count towards the final round-robin on March 2 and four lucky teams from two divisions will have the chance to compete. 

Viewers can also vote online at www.hockeycalgary.ca for the division that they want to see play in the finals. The teams from the two divisions that receive the most votes will then get to play at the home of the Calgary Flames. 

OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network (Canada) announced today another stop for Oprah’s Lifeclass Tour for the first ever broadcast of the show in Canada.

Oprah Winfrey brings her popular series to the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in Toronto for a live show to air Monday, April 16 (8 p.m.- 10 p.m. ET) on OWN.

Winfrey takes the stage in Canada to connect with viewers in person and online about the lessons that guide her life. She will be joined on stage alongside hand-picked experts including life and business catalyst Tony Robbins, spiritualist Deepak Chopra, Bishop T.D. Jakes and inspirational author Iyanla Vanzant.

Oprah’s Lifeclass Tour begins with the premiere episode broadcast live from the Peabody Opera House in St. Louis on Monday, March 26 (8 – 10 p.m. ET), with five additional consecutive new episodes airing every Monday night throughout April.

Oprah’s Lifeclass will again engage fans worldwide online with live streaming at Oprah.com and feature a digital classroom (www.oprah.com/lifeclass) with all-new course work to accompany episode themes.

During its inaugural five week run in October 2011, Oprah’s Lifeclass was a true multi-platform experience. Over 4.1 million students from around the world engaged with Oprah online at Oprah.com to view live webcasts of the series and join the Lifeclass digital classroom to participate in the companion course work.

Oprah’s Lifeclass content received nearly 11 million page views and 1.6 million unique visitors on Oprah.com. Users from over 200 countries viewed the ‘Oprah’s Lifeclass’ webcasts on Facebook and Oprah.com.

The series is produced by Harpo Studios and recently won an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Talk Series. Follow @OprahsLifeclass on Twitter and join the conversation using #OprahsLifeclass.

Oprah’s Lifeclass Tour is being brought to Canada in collaboration with The Power of Women Inc., a world-renowned event management company that produces high profile business, leadership and personal development events that feature some of the world’s most prominent speakers.

In the frontier town of Nome, Alaska, there’s a gold rush on. But you’ve never seen gold mining like this before – here, the precious metal isn’t found in the ground.

It’s sitting in the most unlikely of places:  the bottom of the frigid, unpredictable Bering Sea. And there are a handful of people willing to risk it all to bring it to the surface.

From Thom Beers’ Original Productions, the creators of the Emmy-winning DEADLIEST CATCH, comes the new eight-part series BERING SEA GOLD, premiering on Discovery Channel Monday, March 26 at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

For two million years, glaciers have been melting into the Bering Sea and depositing sediments rich with gold into its waters. As Nome’s ice pack melts during the summer, the isolated, ramshackle town of eccentrics and outcasts booms with excitement, as pioneer gold seekers rush to get out onto the water. Miners dive and dredge to scour the bottom of the sea from custom built, barely seaworthy rigs – in a race to haul in as much gold as possible before the waters become too frigid to dive.

BERING SEA GOLD follows four gold dredges that range wildly in size and sophistication, but all have one thing in common: they’re run by driven – and often desperate – people whose very livelihoods depend on finding gold. Meet the crews of:

The Christine Rose:  More than three times larger than any other craft in these waters, this 24-meter barge is run by Steve Pomrenke, the most successful gold dredger on the Nome scene, and his son Shawn, who captains the vessel. Gruff and no-nonsense, Pomrenke Sr. drives the dredging team – and his son – hard. 

The Clark:  The youngest boat in the fleet, this six-meter diver-operated rig is captained by 24-year-old Nome native Zeke Tenhoff, who built the dredge from junkyard scrap. Tenhoff’s diving partner is childhood friend and greenhorn Emily Riedel, 23. Tenhoff’s motivation is paying off over $100,000 in hospital bills – while opera singer Riedel wants to earn money to go to school in Europe.

The Sluicey:  If The Christine Rose is the show’s Goliath, The Sluicey is its David – a modified skiff that barely seats two. Owner Ian Foster’s learning curve is sharp – he quit his job as a social worker, sank his life savings into his rig, and now he’s got one shot at making his living as a gold dredger. Joining him is Scott Foster (no relation), an experienced dredger who doesn’t miss an opportunity to point out the rookie captain’s shortcomings.

The Wild Ranger:  Owned by retired military man Vernon Adkison, The Wild Ranger is captained by rookie Scott Meisterheim, whose motivation for finding gold is over $100,000 in back child support payments. As Meisterheim says, “I’ve got bills to pay that if you don’t pay, you go to jail for.” The Wild Ranger is joined by greenhorn deckhands, including Steve Riedel, the eccentric father of Emily Riedel, from The Clark.

BERING SEA GOLD illustrates a world like none seen before – one where the danger is palpable and the stakes are high. Success in the waters will give the dredgers the hope and means to continue – and maybe even make them rich. Failure could yield a vast array of consequences – from possible jail time to injury or even death.

Discovery Channel’s flagship magazine series examines one of the biggest and best-recorded natural disasters in history in the captivating one-hour presentation of JAPAN: ONE YEAR LATER – A DAILY PLANET SPECIAL.

Premiering Friday, March 9 at 7 p.m. ET/8 p.m. PT, co-hosts Ziya Tong and Dan Riskin go behind the scenes with the scientists studying why the magnitude 9.0 quake happened, exploring why it was so deadly and damaging and the lessons learned.

And then, Canada’s most popular science show asks the question on everyone’s mind: when – and where – will it happen again?

In Japan, March 11, 2011 will forever be known as 3/11. On that day, at 2:46 p.m. local time, a massive undersea megathrust earthquake 15 times more powerful than government officials thought possible struck off the Japanese coast. The devastation from the ensuing tsunami was unfathomable – killing tens of thousands and causing countless nuclear meltdowns at the Fukushima nuclear facility.

 

Highlights from JAPAN: ONE YEAR LATER – A DAILY PLANET SPECIAL include:

 

Tsunami Inside and Out: Why was it so Deadly? 

The Japanese earthquake of 3/11 was recorded from every possible direction: kilometres above, metres below and all around. Sensors, satellites and social media captured more information than researchers have ever had to work with in history. From above came the most startling image. Scientists had suspected it was possible but this was the first proof – a NASA satellite caught two wave fronts merging to make one giant mega wave.

 

The Next Big One

Much of the world will never have to wonder if they can out run a wave the size of a 10-storey building, but in Japan millions have this on their minds. DAILY PLANET visits Jonathan Karon in Oregon at one of the most advanced tsunami research labs in the U.S. They have developed a casualty simulator that can recreate the coastline as the disaster unfolds. Then, DAILY PLANET looks at Tendenko, the old Japanese concept emphasizing self-preservation that is being brought back to the forefront because of 3/11.

 

Robots at Fukushima

When the earthquake and tsunami hit Japan on 3/11, search and rescue teams from around the world went to help – including those using robots to help scour the rubble piles. In some areas, the levels were too dangerous for even the most protected humans to enter. As a result, robots were sent to help monitor radiation and collect video footage. Picking up the story a year later, DAILY PLANET visits with Dr. Satoshi Tadokoro from Tohoku University, one of the world’s experts in search and rescue robots.

In this week’s all-new W5, CTV’s Omar Sachedina investigates new homes with brand new heating systems that deliver a host of headaches instead of actual heat.

The documentary report “Cold Comfort” premiers Saturday, March 3 at 7 p.m. ET on CTV and CTV Mobile TV. In the evening’s second story “Baby Steps”, Sandie Rinaldo brings viewers the amazing true love story of Canadians Trevor and Debbie Greene.

Captain Trevor Greene nearly died after an axe-attack while serving with Canada’s mission in Afghanistan, but with the unwavering love and support from his wife Debbie and years of rehabilitation, Trevor has overcome the odds to once again become a husband, a father and also a writer.

His book March Forth will be published March 6.

W5 also airs Sundays on CP24 at 1 p.m. ET, and at 7 p.m. on CTV Two, and then on demand on the CTV News Video Player at CTVNews.ca (visit CTV.ca for local listings).

Purchasing a new home is an exciting event, but as heating systems become more energy efficient and complex, homeowners may want to worry about more than their choice of cupboards, counters, paint colours and carpets. W5 investigates cases where brand-new HVAC systems aren’t working properly, with some homeowners finding that their homes are freezing on one floor and downright tropical on another. The program focuses on one type of combo heating system installed in newly-built subdivisions around the Greater Toronto Area and finds hundreds of homes where there has been trouble with the temperature.

Is the problem with the air handling equipment or with the installations? As W5 discovered, unfortunately for home buyers, governments do not require mandatory heating performance testing for combo systems. If the unit is defective or the installation is deficient the problem may not be caught until the mercury dips. Instead of coming to the rescue of homebuyers, in Ontario the warranty provided by Tarion for newly-built homes may leave homeowners shivering in the cold. W5 speaks to homebuyers who were put through a multitude of steps, tests and legal battles in order to get their problems addressed.

In “Baby Steps,” Trevor Greene, a reservist in the Canadian Army and former journalist, was deployed to Kandahar with the 1st Battalion PPCLI Battle Group. While on patrol and meeting with village elders in a remote village, Greene removed his helmet out of respect, confident that a centuries-old pact would protect him from harm. Without warning he was attacked by a Taliban fighter, who came up behind Greene and swung a rusty axe deep into his skull, nearly splitting his brain in two.

While his wife, Debbie, was told that Greene would not live, she never left his side. After years of rehabilitation, setbacks, and crises, Trevor learned to talk and move again. In 2010, W5 shared the Greene’s story as Trevor stood up at his own wedding with Debbie at his side, and their daughter, Grace, carrying the rings down the aisle as the flower girl. W5 revisits the miraculous love story, offering viewers a close-up of Trevor’s ongoing rehabilitation, and reveals a surprise happy development for the Greene family.  

Greene has now written a new book, March Forth, which tells a remarkable story of love, told in two voices: Trevor’s, up until the attack that changed their lives; and Debbie’s, as she worked tirelessly to rehabilitate the man she loves. Together, Trevor and Debbie tell their powerful story of love and determination to overcome unbelievable odds.

CTV and Whizbang Films announced today that production is underway on the new CTV Original Movie, Horses of McBride.

The two-hour movie is inspired by the heart-wrenching true story of how the community of McBride, B.C. pulled together to rescue two starving horses trapped on a mountainside during Christmas 2008.

Written and directed by Anne Wheeler (BOMB GIRLS, END GAME, THE GAMBLER, THE GIRL AND THE GUNSLINGER), HORSES OF MCBRIDE stars Aidan Quinn (PRIME SUSPECT, WEEDS, BURY MY HEART AT WOUNDED KNEE) and Canadians Kari Matchett (COVERT AFFAIRS, LEVERAGE, 24) and Mackenzie Porter (DINOSAPIEN, WILD ROSES, THE HAUNTING HOUR). Principal photography is underway in and around Calgary, Alberta through March 16, 2012.

In HORSES OF MCBRIDE, cowboy-outfitter Matt Davidson (Quinn) has decided to sell his family ranch and find work in the city. His daughter Nicki (Porter), who dreams of being a guide with her dad, is shocked and angry. It’s late December when two starving horses are discovered high up on the Rockies trapped in a prison of snow more than 30 miles from any road. After seeing the spirit in their eye, Nicki commits to getting them off the mountain – somehow. With no other options, she picks up a shovel and starts to dig out the mile long path of deep snow, inspiring her father, family and an entire community to pitch in. 

The story came to Whizbang Films’ attention on Boxing Day three years ago when the horses’ story appeared on the front page of newspapers across the country. The producers approached Anne Wheeler to write and direct the project and she enthusiastically accepted the challenge. In researching the story that inspired the film, Wheeler spent considerable time with the Jeck family in B.C, who were instrumental in the horses’ rescue.

In casting the equine “stars” of the film, the producers have rescued two live horses which, with the support of the SPCA and under the watchful eye of legendary wrangler John Scott, will underline the miracle that took place in McBride three years ago. The mare’s name is “Lady”, rescued near Cochrane, Alberta. The gelding, “Slim”, was rescued near Penticton, B.C.

“The story of McBride and these horses captured the attention of the entire country,” said Phil King, President, CTV Programming and Sports. “CTV is proud to stand behind this captivating tale of community and conviction and we look forward to bringing this story to life again for viewers.”

“This is a story about a determined family and community who rallied behind two incredible horses and riveted a nation for many days as the drama unfolded under extreme conditions,” says producer Frank Siracusa of Whizbang Films. “It’s a privilege to make this film with such a talented creative team.”

“There was a great deal on the line, not only for the horses, but for the family and a town facing profound change.” says Wheeler. “But shoveling a path over a mile long to save two starving horses says a lot about what these people are made of. I am grateful to have this opportunity to tell their story.”