CTV celebrates one year anniversary of Vancouver 2010

For 17 days, Canadians came together in celebration as our Olympians stood tall and made the world take notice.  Now, one year later, CTV takes viewers on a journey back to that magical moment in time that galvanized the country and made believers of us all.

CTV has produced two original programs celebrating Vancouver 2010 and Canada’s Olympians: VANCOUVER 2010 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL, and the documentary 17 DAYS.  The programs air this weekend to coincide with the one-year anniversary of the Olympic Winter Games (see programming details below).

In addition, from February 11 to March 1, ETALK will showcase interviews with Olympians on the one year anniversary of their medal performance.  On TSN, SPORTSCENTRE will highlight the key events and medal performances on each day of competition, one year later, while THAT’S HOCKEY will revisit each Team Canada game on the corresponding day.

 “The pride and passion Canadians experienced during Vancouver 2010 was at an all-time high.  Our athletes delivered inspiring and stellar performances that, to this day, continue to bring heartfelt joy,” said Susanne Boyce, President, Creative, Content and Channels, CTV Inc.  “The one year anniversary is a perfect time to sit back, relax and enjoy those special moments that made us proud to say we are Canadian.”

VANCOUVER 2010 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL

Airing Sunday, Feb. 13 from 7 to 9 p.m. local time (9 to 11 p.m. local in Manitoba and Saskatchewan)

Encore presentations on TSN – Feb. 13 at 11:30 p.m. ET, Feb. 19 at 11:30 a.m. ET

Encore presentation on TSN2 – Feb. 14 at 6 p.m. ET

On-demand at CTV.ca and 2010.ctv.ca – Feb. 14 at 7 p.m. ET

 

VANCOUVER 2010 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL is a two-hour retrospective that uses a blend of Games highlights, never-before-seen interviews, anecdotes and reflections that weave together the moments of achievement and drama that touched the hearts of all Canadians.  Hosted by Brian Williams with James Duthie and Lisa LaFlamme in Vancouver and Jennifer Hedger in Whistler, the special catches up with Canada’s Olympians one year later. 

The majority of Canadian medallists are highlighted in the special.  Also featured are John Furlong, who reflects on his dream and his journey one year following the Games, and Wayne Gretzky, who discusses his perspective on the Opening Ceremony, the honour of lighting the cauldron and what the Games meant to Canada.

VANCOUVER 2010 OLYMPIC WINTER GAMES ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL opens with a heartfelt essay exploring how Vancouver 2010 changed Canada and the belief that the Olympic flame and all that it represents still burns in the hearts of Canadians.  The special closes with another poignant essay from Lloyd Robertson and his perspective on the effects of Vancouver 2010 on the national psyche. 

The special also includes stories and photos from Canadians across the country, as well as the Bell Memorable Moment – the most memorable moment of the Games, as chosen by Canadians in an online poll.

To enhance the viewers’ experience, a digital component has been created through online (2010.ctv.ca), mobile and tablet devices to deliver a true multimedia storytelling experience.  Available now, there are more than 150 videos of interviews, highlights, news items and broadcast features that enrich the back story of the television segments.  During the broadcast, users will be able to use a dynamic timeline to filter the videos, narrowing the selection to only those videos that are relevant to what is airing on television at that moment.

 

17 DAYS

Airing Saturday, Feb. 12 on CTV; 7 to 8 p.m. local time

Encore presentations on TSN – Feb. 13 at 11:30 a.m. ET, Feb. 14 at 1:30 p.m. ET

Encore presentations on TSN2 – Feb. 13 at 3 p.m. ET, Feb. 16 at 9:30 p.m. ET

On-demand at CTV.ca and 2010.ctv.ca – Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. ET

 

Just as the Olympians experienced moments of high drama and pressure, so too did the team at Canada’s Olympic Broadcast Media Consortium, who brought the Games to Canadians and delivered the athletes’ stories.

It is not known in the general public what these storytellers do and why.  This documentary turns the camera’s unblinking eye on the professional choices made by the people at the Consortium who were privileged to tell present and future generations the historic story of the ‘seventeen days’ in February when Canada hosted the world for the 2010 Winter Games.

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