Honorary memberships for The Big Bang Theory creators Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady

The Royal Canadian Institute for the Advancement of Science (the RCI) is pleased to announce today that it has awarded an Honorary Membership in the RCI to Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady, executive producers and co-creators of the hit television series The Big Bang Theory.

The RCI, founded in 1849, is Canada’s oldest scientific organization and is dedicated to promoting the public’s understanding of science primarily through public lectures, scholarships, and the Sir Sandford Fleming medal for science communication.

Jim Parsons (Sheldon), Simon Helberg (Howard), and Kunal Nayyar (Raj) of The Big Bang Theory are accepting the award on their behalf following the taping of Live at etalk: The Big Bang Theory in Toronto. The special tapes this afternoon from CTV’s Queen St. HQ. 

“We are honoring Chuck Lorre, Bill Prady and the entire Big Bang Theory team for creating a television program that seamlessly melds science and everyday life,” said Bruce Gitelman, President, RCI. “The program exposes the public in an entertaining way to the awe and wonder of science and life in general. As the number one series in Canada today, it not only makes science accessible to the public but also entertains many practicing scientists.”

In a statement, Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady said: “Messrs. Chuck Lorre and Bill Prady do, with great humility, accept Honorary Membership in the Royal Canadian Institute for the Advancement of Science.

Those who toil in the field of science often wait patiently for their work to be acknowledged.  Einstein, for example, waited years for the Nobel committee to bestow its award for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect.  In light of this, your honorees harbor no resentment that it has taken the Institute decades to reach across the border and recognize Mr. Lorre for his groundbreaking fourth grade work in neurology entitled “How Smart is the Human Brain? (An Extra-Credit Project)” and Mr. Prady for his definitive exploration of zoological ophthalmology in the seventh grade science fair entry, “Dissecting a Calf’s Eye.”

As members, your honorees pledge to do everything in their power to advance the interests of Canadian scientists in the global community.  For example, every time someone uses a telephone, they will note:  “Did you know that was invented by Alexander Graham Bell, a Canadian scientist?”  They will also look on Wikipedia and find names of other Canadian scientists to talk about.

Finally, while Messrs. Lorre and Prady are baffled as to why such an august group would seek to honor them, they are truly thrilled you have done so.”

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