Test The Nation on CBC

Sunday, Jan. 24 at 8 p.m. on CBC TV

What do a politician, a Stanley Cup-winning goalie, the first Canadian in space and a roller derby star have in common? Find out Sunday, Jan. 24 as Justin Trudeau, Glenn Healy, Marc Garneau and Candy Crossbones go head-to-head on CBC’s TEST THE NATION: IQ.

Hosted by George Stroumboulopoulos (The Hour, The Strombo Show) and Carole MacNeil (CBC News Network) this coast-to-coast IQ challenge tests the star-studded smarts of 180 in-studio team members, including Kelly Hrudey, Dragons’ Den’s W. Brett Wilson and Little Mosque on the Prairie’s Brandon Firla. This Canada-wide battle of the brains gets underway at 8 p.m. on CBC-TV.

Six dynamic teams featuring twins, politicians, atheists, believers, athletes and nerds are set to compete live in studio. At the same time, Canadians can take the test by printing a scorecard or by participating online at cbc.ca/testthenation.

“We are taking the idea of a general IQ test and essentially putting it into a Roman Coliseum. I can’t wait to find out who survives,” says Stroumboulopoulos.

In a new twist, Toronto hypnotherapist Donald Currie will put selected team members under hypnosis. Tune in to find out if this technique actually increases participants’ IQ scores. Canadians will also have a chance to see how their intelligence stacks up against members of Canada’s Mensa Society.

This year’s test was created by two of Canada’s leading intelligence-testing experts, Dr. James Parker of Trent University and Dr. Don Saklofske of the University of Calgary. The 50 multiple choice questions are closely modeled after those found in standardized IQ tests and aim to evaluate performance in key areas of intelligence, including language comprehension, visual perception, memory, math and logical reasoning.

The debut of TEST THE NATION: IQ on CBC-TV in 2007 was a tremendous success, with more than 1.5 million viewers and 200,000 people taking the test online.

“I think every Canadian deep down is curious about where they would rank on an IQ test. Because CBC knows that Canadians are smart and inquisitive, we’re putting them to the test in the comfort of their own living rooms as we test the nation,” says Kirstine Stewart, general manager, CBC-TV.

About the author